What is involved in the birth and later

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Glenys
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Re: What is involved in the birth and later

Post by Glenys » 07 Jan 2010, 08:24

Just take a look at this link shows you how it isnt often straight forward having puppies we have been lucky with Gracie and hopefully Rose.


http://www.champdogsforum.co.uk/board/topic/120752.html

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Melliott
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Re: What is involved in the birth and later

Post by Melliott » 07 Jan 2010, 14:29

Crikey, that must be so worrying if the pups can't feed, get dehydrated etc, it makes you realised how well Gracie has done - I hope Rose does as well as her.

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Re: What is involved in the birth and later

Post by madjack » 08 Jan 2010, 10:41

Here's a question, Glenys. What with Rose hanging on to those pups, I wondered if you had to intervene like in the human world? A woman is not left longer than 2 weeks after her due date. Is there a similar concern with bitches?
Maybe those little 'uns know just how cold it is. Who can blame them for wanting to stay where they are!
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Re: What is involved in the birth and later

Post by tosca100 » 08 Jan 2010, 10:48

Best place for them I should think.....not good for Sue-in-waiting though! :1967:

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Re: What is involved in the birth and later

Post by Glenys » 08 Jan 2010, 19:26

madjack wrote:Here's a question, Glenys. What with Rose hanging on to those pups, I wondered if you had to intervene like in the human world? A woman is not left longer than 2 weeks after her due date. Is there a similar concern with bitches?
Maybe those little 'uns know just how cold it is. Who can blame them for wanting to stay where they are!
Arlene,x.

I have to say that I didnt think she was ready the Vet said wednesday but I was surprised I would have said more like monday next or around that time but as we lady's know babies can surprise us.
I knew Gracie was imminent as soon as I saw her.
If she begins to strain and show distress then the Vet would give her an injection to start contractions if that didnt start her then she would have a cesarean section to deliver the pups.
This is where unlike a human Mum where one incision is made the pups are in the uterus which is like a horse shoe shape the vet has to make an incision over each pup and lift it out so its a difficult task and a big op for the Mum

Sometimes The Mum then wakes up and is very confused she went to sleep and here are all these pups :dontknow: sometimes a Mum will reject the pups but usually accept them in this case you have to be quite firm and keep placing the puppies on the teats.

I am sure Rose will be fine I just dont think she is quite ready yet but that is just my humble opinion.

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Re: What is involved in the birth and later

Post by madjack » 08 Jan 2010, 19:49

It doesn't surprise me that you think she's not ready. Scans, in the human, world can be inaccurate up to half a pound each way when trying to estimate a baby's weight! So in dog terms, I guess the scan be just as inaccurate when guessing how ready the pups are. She's enjoying keeping us guessing, I think! :thumbright:

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Re: What is involved in the birth and later

Post by Springfield » 10 Jan 2010, 00:29

Glenys wrote:
madjack wrote:Here's a question, Glenys. What with Rose hanging on to those pups, I wondered if you had to intervene like in the human world? A woman is not left longer than 2 weeks after her due date. Is there a similar concern with bitches?
Maybe those little 'uns know just how cold it is. Who can blame them for wanting to stay where they are!
Arlene,x.

I have to say that I didnt think she was ready the Vet said wednesday but I was surprised I would have said more like monday next or around that time but as we lady's know babies can surprise us.
I knew Gracie was imminent as soon as I saw her.
If she begins to strain and show distress then the Vet would give her an injection to start contractions if that didnt start her then she would have a cesarean section to deliver the pups.
This is where unlike a human Mum where one incision is made the pups are in the uterus which is like a horse shoe shape the vet has to make an incision over each pup and lift it out so its a difficult task and a big op for the Mum

Sometimes The Mum then wakes up and is very confused she went to sleep and here are all these pups :dontknow: sometimes a Mum will reject the pups but usually accept them in this case you have to be quite firm and keep placing the puppies on the teats.

I am sure Rose will be fine I just dont think she is quite ready yet but that is just my humble opinion.
Both Glenys and Carol said Rose was a least a week, if not two, behind Gracie when they first saw her. Sometimes there is no substitute for experience!

All quiet again tonight, but she seems content and is definately still growing!! :1973:

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Re: What is involved in the birth and later

Post by karen_h » 10 Jan 2010, 09:17

We just hope everything goes well & know they will be worth waiting for.

Maybe they are listening to the weather forecast & have decided to hang in a bit longer!

Regards,
Paddy, Becks & family X

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Re: What is involved in the birth and later

Post by susa » 10 Jan 2010, 10:25

Do you know who the sire is to these pups at all?
It may already have been mentioned and I missed it.

Good luck with all the pups, its a harrowing time, and a very tiring one for you all as well as the new Mum, and she is just so young.

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Re: What is involved in the birth and later

Post by choccielover » 10 Jan 2010, 10:52

I think it's unknown for definite who Dad is, but wasn't the assumption that it was the brother of the 3 bitches (Fudge) as they'd all lived together? However I guess as they appear to have been free roaming it could be anyone/anything. Fudge was up for re-homing, not caught up yet with whether he's found a new home. Helen
(adopted Oscar, choc lab from MKF 4/9/07)

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Re: What is involved in the birth and later

Post by Glenys » 10 Jan 2010, 12:10

choccielover wrote:I think it's unknown for definite who Dad is, but wasn't the assumption that it was the brother of the 3 bitches (Fudge) as they'd all lived together? However I guess as they appear to have been free roaming it could be anyone/anything. Fudge was up for re-homing, not caught up yet with whether he's found a new home. Helen


It is highly likely that the Brother is the father as they were not running free on the streets but before anyone jumps in with shock horror the foour dogs were originally extremely well bred hips eys etc..

Brother to sister mating whilst isnt ideal is not going to lead to bad things as the parents as I say are quality dogs ie: close breeding usually doubles up on the quality and doubles up on the negative too but as the parents have lovely temperaments and are healthy the pups should be too I have found no negative traits in any of the dogs.
If these had been puppy farmed adults of low quality and temperament then there would be a worry but if I was looking for a pup as a family pet I would be glad to have one of these.

Many of the best dogs at one time were half brother to sister matings uncles to neices etc.. it wasnt frowned on.

There are several kinds of breeding line breeding and out cross breeding that is when a breeder will line breed bringing in close relatives with excellent atributes or total out cross to bring in new blood.


The Father if its Fudge is an excellent dog and gone from no manners to being a trainable lovely boy


When I saw Rose I did a double take she is the image nearly of my own top winning show dog Nell so if anyone is considering applying for a puppy applications open soon you will have a nice new addition to your family.

It would be a no no though for any of the pups to be bred from in the future .

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Re: What is involved in the birth and later

Post by SueA » 10 Jan 2010, 18:08

The Father if its Fudge is an excellent dog and gone from no manners to being a trainable lovely boy
I agree with what Glenys has seen in these dogs. Kizzy (Storm) knew no commands when I picked her up on Wednesday. Within a couple of days, she was responding well to her new name, would 'sit' and often did before I gave the command because she knew a treat would be forthcoming (not daft, these labs!!!) She will now sit without a treat. She knows 'come', 'wait', 'stay' and responds most of the time to these. There is definite potential there .She is a very loving dog and I am so lucky to have her.
If this runs in the family, anyone taking on her brother and sisters and their pups will have a lot to look forward to.
Sue

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Re: What is involved in the birth and later

Post by benjiesmum » 10 Jan 2010, 18:28

SueA wrote:
The Father if its Fudge is an excellent dog and gone from no manners to being a trainable lovely boy
I agree with what Glenys has seen in these dogs. Kizzy (Storm) knew no commands when I picked her up on Wednesday. Within a couple of days, she was responding well to her new name, would 'sit' and often did before I gave the command because she knew a treat would be forthcoming (not daft, these labs!!!) She will now sit without a treat. She knows 'come', 'wait', 'stay' and responds most of the time to these. There is definite potential there .She is a very loving dog and I am so lucky to have her.
If this runs in the family, anyone taking on her brother and sisters and their pups will have a lot to look forward to.
Sue

So pleased that Kizzy is starting to respond to you Sue! I bet you are so happy to have her. :love5:

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Re: What is involved in the birth and later

Post by mollysmum » 10 Jan 2010, 18:41

Before we were lucky enough to adopt Molly, we had though of havin puppies off Katie. Having spent a whole year thinking about it we decided that we did not have the time, room or money to do it properly (Hip and eye scores). We the got Molly and I must admit that it was one of the best decisions we ever made not to breed. They are both speyed now and never looked back. Reading all this from Glenys has made me sooo glad we never went down that route and would never entertain the idea again.

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